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Earl david worden homeland security

May 11, An open carry activist who was arrested in March during an open carry demonstration said Olmos Park police deleted his footage before returning his camera. But Jim Everad said he was able to recover the footage with software he downloaded from the internet. Now he plans to turn the SD card over to forensic investigators to determine when the footage was deleted, which depending on the time, could implicate the police department if it was deleted when the camera was in its possession.

Everad says he and fellow open carry activist, C. Grisham, who was also arrested during the March 27 demonstration are planning on filing a federal lawsuit against the police department. The recovered video shows that verbal exchange never took place. The violent arrest was captured on other video as well, including the part where Grisham was tasered, which can be found in its entirety here.

The demonstrators were protesting against a city ordinance banning the open carry of long guns without a license by anybody except police officers, which went against state law that does permit it. The activists were charged with resisting, impeding a walkway, and interfering with the duties of law enforcement. They were released 21 hours later after posting bond.

Charges against them were all dropped last week. Everad says that Grisham, who is the Open Texas Carry president, phoned the Police Chief Rene Valinciano the day before their arrival to ensure that police would not be caught off guard and there would be no violence. The recording can be heard in the above video. But when the two arrived with several other activists who were also recording the incident, they were met with assault rifles drawn and were ordered to lay face down on the ground. Everad says he never expected the incident to escalate the way it did and was even more surprised with the chief slammed him on his head after he had already been handcuffed, causing a concussion.

Everad also suffered broken bones in his wrist. The two men were taken, along with activists Joanna Castro who was arrested on a warrant, to the Olmos Park police department where officers kept them for eight hours bound in handcuffs and shackles. They were eventually taken to the Bexar County jail where they were posted bond. Everad says officers denied medical attention to both he and Grisham, who also suffered from a contusion on head.

The Olmos Park City Council repealed it's gun ordinancewhich had been in effect sincetwo days after the protest. Watch the recovered video here.

Carlos Miller contributed to this report. Although this is not a crime, it is.Don't have an account yet? Get the most out of your experience with a personalized all-access pass to everything local on events, music, restaurants, news and more.

On back-to-back days, two men were arrested on the same isolated section of sidewalk on the corner of the entrance to Shell's oil refinery in Deer Park. Both men came to the scene wielding video cameras, and both refused to identify themselves when off-duty Harris County Sheriff's deputies approached them to investigate what a Sheriff's spokesman later called "a very real terroristic threat. The two men, Earl David Worden and Phillip Turner, are part of Photography Is Not A Crime, a national organization that intends to test the limits of the legal right to photograph places.

According to Harris County Sheriff's Office spokesman Ryan Sullivan, those guys are right: photography is definitely not a crime, and that's not what they were arrested for.

It extends into a more threatening and dangerous situation when the actions you're taking to incite that interaction takes place in a security district as a very real terroristic threat.

It's your right to videotape, but if you're going to do that you should do so lawfully and comply with the orders of officers that are investigating something that could be very hazardous to public safety. According to Sullivan, Worden was spotted on security camera footage on Monday "wandering the property line, highly camouflaged, wearing a jacket in 75 degree weather, videotaping the operations of a major refinery in the Houston Ship Channel," prompting law enforcement officials to investigate.

When they arrived, Worden refused to identify himself and was taken into custody. He was charged with "interfering with the duties of a public servant. OK, let's review. Run around an oil refinery with a videocamera and a camo jacket, then refuse to tell anyone who you are or what you're doing?

Could be a terrorist, so you're going to be arrested. That actually sounds reasonable— now file that helpful information away for later. After Worden was arrested, he called Turner from jail later that night, prompting Turner to drive in from Austin to try to find out what happened to his friend by following in his footsteps, according to Turner's YouTube channel.

Unsurprisingly, Turner also ended up in jail, but not before his camera caught an odd encounter in which neither party — law enforcement nor Turner — really seemed to know what was legal and what was not.

Turner recorded the incident in its entirety and posted the nearly 30 minute video on YouTube. For the first 15 minutes or so, Turner videotapes from a sidewalk across the street from Shell. No one bothers him until around the 19 minute mark, when he makes the fateful decision to cross the street and stand on a disconnected section of sidewalk on the corner of Shell's entrance, which he said was where Worden was arrested. If Turner truly did want to photograph the Shell station, he could have done so just fine from across the street, although his videography skills need some work — the camera was somehow flipped upside down for about 10 minutes of the early footage, and it was poorly framed throughout.

Photography is not a crime, but if it's this bad then maybe it should be. If you want results, sometimes you have to go get it.

It is unclear what Turner meant by "results," but if he intended to get arrested, then he quickly got what he was looking for. As soon as Turner crossed the street, a Deer Park Police officer drove over and approached him. The officer did not arrest him or threaten him with arrest, but she did ask him a few reasonable questions like, what's he doing standing on an incomplete chunk of pavement alongside a freeway service road. Turner told her he was a journalist working on a story about filming in public, and he also declined to tell the officer his name when she asked.

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The officer politely told Turner that she was concerned for his safety, and that she just wanted to check things out to make sure he wasn't going to cross the street into traffic. She advised Turner that he was on Shell's property, and that if Shell's security came out and requested that he leave, he would have to do so. Then she left. A few other patrol cars immediately pulled up as Turner defiantly clung to his decrepit patch of sidewalk.

It's not a big deal. You can find these images on Google Maps, and anybody can access Google. He asserted his right to remain on the section of sidewalk a few feet away from the chainlink fence, which to an untrained eye would appear to be the boundary of Shell's property.Apr 24, Who was standing in front of a federal building legally recording from a public sidewalk Thursday, claiming they were in fear for their safety.

However, David Worden made no indication he would strike the agents in the face with his cameras.

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In fact, Worden had been standing on the public sidewalk in front of the FBI building for more than 15 minutes, debating with a pair of other FBI agents about whether or not they had the right to tell him to stop recording, including one agent who made it clear he was not threatened by the cameras. But Byers stormed up and swiped his camera anyway, a hulking man claiming to be terrified of cameras.

Worden said he was actually trying to call for El Paso police to report the agent for ripping his other camera out of his hands.

Once the agents had him in handcuffs and the two cameras were laying on the sidewalk behind them, they noticed a third camera, the body camera camera he was wearing that was recording the egregious Constitutional violations. So they attempted to remove that camera as well, but failed to do so because he had it fastened to his shirt in a way that made it impossible for them to seize it.

Instead, they just shoved it downwards where it continued recording for 90 minutes as they sat him down on the hot asphalt in handcuffs. But these words were only expressed after he had his cameras swiped from him and his arms twisted behind his back in handcuffs.

In other words, in Texas, you can be the victim of robbery and battery, but if you dare respond with vulgarity, you will be the one charged. Comey ic. A woman who live-streamed a police officer as he lay on the ground dying is receiving death threats. Jun 24, Mar 15, The cop tasered the dog's owner twice before he let go of the dog leash. Jul 26, Mar 17, Montana cops walked into a woman's home without a warrant after hearing loud talking inside. May 2, A New Jersey man took matters into his own hands and removed what he calls a desecrated American from an intersection.

May 28, Feb 18, A Pittsburgh firefighter caught on video restraining a year-old boy he thought was vandalizing charged with assault.

Jul 3, Mar 6, Cops in North Carolina claimed they received a hang up call, then smelled marijuana before searching a home. May 29, Mar 19, A NY man was stopped without cause at a sidewalk checkpoint; cops go on fishing expedition, claim his camera is illegal. May 22, Feb 15, A NY man spent Father's Day in jail after police mistook him for the wrong suspect and arrested him over air freshener.

Jun 21, Jul 13, Jun 11, Aug 20, May 8, Feb 25, On Monday Dec. The complex falls within the Houston Ship Channel Security District, a designated security district established by the Texas Legislature, and overseen by the Captain of the Port. Deputies working an approved extra job at the refinery complex were dispatched to the southern border of the facility were they encountered a male subject matching the description of the broadcast sent by Shell security personnel.

The subject was a white male, wearing a heavily camouflaged jacket walking along the property line with a video recording device. Temperatures at the time were in excess of 70 degrees Fahrenheit. The male subject was ordered to comply with a safety and security check of his person.

earl david worden homeland security

After repeated verbal commands, deputies were forced to physically restrain the subject in order to complete their investigation. While attempting to identify the subject, deputies learned that the male was on the Shell property the day prior, where he engaged Deer Park Police Officers in the same manner.

It was further learned that the subject had a lengthy history of confrontations with. Immediate and decisive response from deputies continues to safeguard the targets of potential interference or attack.

For more information on newspaper subscriptions and newspaper delivery, call or email deliveryservice hcnonline. For information on local classifieds and other HCN advertising, call Important Contacts. More Pasadena News. Photos: Houston neighborhoods spread hope during pandemic. USPS program alerts residents on arrival of stimulus checks. Costco lets first responders, healthcare workers cut in line. Stay Connected.Need your password? No citizen account yet? Register now for free. The complex falls within the Houston Ship Channel Security District, a designated security district established by the Texas Legislature, and overseen by the Captain of the Port.

Deputies working an approved extra job at the refinery complex were dispatched to the southern border of the facility were they encountered a male subject matching the description of the broadcast sent by Shell security personnel.

The subject was a white male, wearing a heavily camouflaged jacket walking along the property line with a video recording device. Temperatures at the time were in excess of 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

The male subject was ordered to comply with a safety and security check of his person. After repeated verbal commands, deputies were forced to physically restrain the subject in order to complete their investigation.

While attempting to identify the subject, deputies learned that the male was on the Shell property the day prior, where he engaged Deer Park Police Officers in the same manner.

Immediate and decisive response from deputies continues to safeguard the targets of potential interference or attack. Contact Emergency: Non-emergencies: Receive alerts from your local agencies. Full Notification. Message and data rates may apply. Message frequency varies. Terms and privacy.Don't have an account yet? Get the most out of your experience with a personalized all-access pass to everything local on events, music, restaurants, news and more.

On back-to-back days, two men were arrested on the same isolated section of sidewalk on the corner of the entrance to Shell's oil refinery in Deer Park. Both men came to the scene wielding video cameras, and both refused to identify themselves when off-duty Harris County Sheriff's deputies approached them to investigate what a Sheriff's spokesman later called "a very real terroristic threat.

The two men, Earl David Worden and Phillip Turner, are part of Photography Is Not A Crime, a national organization that intends to test the limits of the legal right to photograph places. According to Harris County Sheriff's Office spokesman Ryan Sullivan, those guys are right: photography is definitely not a crime, and that's not what they were arrested for.

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It extends into a more threatening and dangerous situation when the actions you're taking to incite that interaction takes place in a security district as a very real terroristic threat.

It's your right to videotape, but if you're going to do that you should do so lawfully and comply with the orders of officers that are investigating something that could be very hazardous to public safety.

According to Sullivan, Worden was spotted on security camera footage on Monday "wandering the property line, highly camouflaged, wearing a jacket in 75 degree weather, videotaping the operations of a major refinery in the Houston Ship Channel," prompting law enforcement officials to investigate. When they arrived, Worden refused to identify himself and was taken into custody. He was charged with "interfering with the duties of a public servant. OK, let's review.

Run around an oil refinery with a videocamera and a camo jacket, then refuse to tell anyone who you are or what you're doing? Could be a terrorist, so you're going to be arrested. That actually sounds reasonable— now file that helpful information away for later. After Worden was arrested, he called Turner from jail later that night, prompting Turner to drive in from Austin to try to find out what happened to his friend by following in his footsteps, according to Turner's YouTube channel.

Unsurprisingly, Turner also ended up in jail, but not before his camera caught an odd encounter in which neither party — law enforcement nor Turner — really seemed to know what was legal and what was not. Turner recorded the incident in its entirety and posted the nearly 30 minute video on YouTube.

For the first 15 minutes or so, Turner videotapes from a sidewalk across the street from Shell. No one bothers him until around the 19 minute mark, when he makes the fateful decision to cross the street and stand on a disconnected section of sidewalk on the corner of Shell's entrance, which he said was where Worden was arrested.

If Turner truly did want to photograph the Shell station, he could have done so just fine from across the street, although his videography skills need some work — the camera was somehow flipped upside down for about 10 minutes of the early footage, and it was poorly framed throughout. Photography is not a crime, but if it's this bad then maybe it should be.

If you want results, sometimes you have to go get it. It is unclear what Turner meant by "results," but if he intended to get arrested, then he quickly got what he was looking for. As soon as Turner crossed the street, a Deer Park Police officer drove over and approached him. The officer did not arrest him or threaten him with arrest, but she did ask him a few reasonable questions like, what's he doing standing on an incomplete chunk of pavement alongside a freeway service road.

Turner told her he was a journalist working on a story about filming in public, and he also declined to tell the officer his name when she asked. The officer politely told Turner that she was concerned for his safety, and that she just wanted to check things out to make sure he wasn't going to cross the street into traffic.

She advised Turner that he was on Shell's property, and that if Shell's security came out and requested that he leave, he would have to do so. Then she left. A few other patrol cars immediately pulled up as Turner defiantly clung to his decrepit patch of sidewalk. It's not a big deal. You can find these images on Google Maps, and anybody can access Google. He asserted his right to remain on the section of sidewalk a few feet away from the chainlink fence, which to an untrained eye would appear to be the boundary of Shell's property.

According to the deputy, however, Shell's property extended further, though he admitted on camera that he did not know for sure how far. Based on the language in the Texas Penal code, it appears as though Turner was in the right here when he initially declined to provide his ID prior to arrest:.It's here for your enjoyment.

Please feel free to leave comments. I want to hear from you!

Earl David Worden

My name is Joe and I am married to Sandy. We have four children: Heather, Wesley, Luke and Colton. Originally from Colorado, we live in Rosenberg, Texas.

View my complete profile. This is a tale of two monumental failures. On Feb. He was initially contacted by Officer Lewis Jefferson, who introduced himself and asked who he was and what he was doing. The photographer said he was filming exterior shots of the police department but, citing his right to privacy, declined to give his name.

A short time later Jefferson returned with Sgt.

Two men linked to same group arrested at Shell refinery in Deer Park

Phillip Englishbee, who again asked the man what he was doing and asked to see his identification. Englishbee and Jefferson handcuffed him and briefly detained him after he repeatedly declined to comply with their demand for identification.

Arrest UPDATE 12-5-19

The man asked to see the police chief or an assistant police chief, and when Assistant Chief Lance Bothell came out, the photographer presented him with a business card and was released. The confrontation has been posted in a pair of videos on a YouTube channel operated by News Now Houston, which appears to be operated by this so-called photojournalist.

Basically, he is a professional police-baiter. He films at public but sensitive places like police stations and oil refineries in an attempt to get police to confront him. Inevitably they do, and he posts videos of the confrontations on YouTube and decries the violation of his first amendment rights. He was successful in using that form of instigative not investigative reporting in Missouri City. The police fell right into his trap and he played them like a fiddle.

To be sure, the police officers were in the wrong to detain him. That was a big mistake on their part and now a lesson learned. Please understand that there is an enormous difference between what Worden does and what real, trained, professional journalists do.

In my year career I have had my share of run-ins with law enforcement officers who have tried to stop me from performing my job as a reporter.

earl david worden homeland security

More often than not, that is a rarity and I find most officers to be helpful and accommodating. What Worden and his cohorts do is intentionally antagonize the police. His activities appear to push the limits of free speech. I have a great deal of respect for all defenders of the first amendment, but I draw the line at those who intentionally abuse that right and maliciously attempt to entrap others, especially the police.

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The last thing they need is someone bent on tripping them up and publicly shaming them. I understand what Worden is doing; I just strongly disagree with his tactics. If someone were videotaping the outside of my house, even though it would be perfectly legal, I would consider that a potential threat and would call the police to investigate.

I highly doubt Worden would want anyone standing outside his house shooting video, especially a police officer, which they would be within their right to do. I suspect the fact that he is a registered sex offender and has a history of legal trouble probably points to his disdain for law enforcement officers.

earl david worden homeland security

This is speculation on my part and I could be wrong, but I doubt it. The biggest issue I have with Worden and his ilk is the damage they do to the reputation of real journalists. You must understand that what he is doing is not journalism. He is not a reporter.

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He does not work for a legitimate newsgathering organization. Yes, the first amendment gives him the right to do what he does, but he does so in an irresponsible and disrespectful manner.